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307th Bombardment Group (Heavy)—Research

307th Bomb Group Archive Materails
The 307th Bomb Group archives include thousands of pictures, documents and other materials that will be digitalized over the next few years.
The 307th Bomb Group is in the process of sorting, cataloging and digitalizing all materials

The 307th Bomb Group (H) Organization is in the process of sorting, cataloging and digitalizing materials collected over the lat 60 years. The materials include thousands of pictures, documents, diaries and other materials relating to the 307th Bomb Group. As the materials are put into a digital file format, they will be searchable and available through this web site. The process is going to take a long time (1-2 years), however, once complete it will be the most comprehensive collection of 307th Bomb Group resources available. Our goal is to preserve the history of the 307th Bomb Group for future generations.

Share your 307th Bomb Group History!

At the same time we ask that you share your 307th BG stories, documents, and pictures. Your legacy should not be lost in an attic, or stored in a garage, where it may later be disposed of as trash. Ask your children, your grand-children and even your great grand-children to participate in this effort to preserve your history. Documents and photos will be returned on request

Research Tips from ArmyAirForces.com web site:

The ArmyAirForces.com web site is a great resource to locate and research any Army Air Forces information from WWII.

The Army Air Forces of WWII generated a lot of paperwork. Many of these records exist today in their original form or on microfilm and microfiche. These records are maintained at a handful of facilities around the country.

Visit the ArmyAirForces.com research page for information about records you can locate through the archives including:

  • Personnel records: These records are maintained by the National Personnel Records Center, Military Personnel Records in St. Louis Missouri. Unfortunately a fire in 1973 destroyed many records, but you should always start here. If you are not a family member you will be prevented by the Privacy Act of 1974 in the amount of information you can obtain via this source.
  • 293 file, Individual Deceased Personnel File: This file is maintained by the Department of the Army in Washington, DC. If the veteran you are researching was Killed in Action you will definitely want to obtain this file. This file documents the activities of the Graves Registration Command and the Army to locate, identify, and provide a final resting place for the deceased.
  • Missing Air Crew Reports (MACR): If your research involves the loss of an aircraft in a combat situation and not in Allied territory, the MACR will be invaluable. This document was generated shortly after the loss of the aircraft (usually within a day or so) and lists the crew roster, aircraft, and basic details of the loss including eye witness statements if they were available. ArmyAirForces.com has a fairly complete index of MACRs which may aid you.
  • POW Questionnaire: National Archives and Record Administration (NARA). If crew members survived the loss of the aircraft and were captured and interred.
  • World War II Prisoners of War Data File: These records identify World War II U.S. military officers and soldiers and U.S. and some Allied civilians who were prisoners of war (POWs) and internees - [database]. (Select the orange "Search" button, then "Wars / International Relations: World War II" link, Records of World War II Prisoners of War, created, 1942 - 1947 "Search" button). You can enter a search term right away if you know what terms to search for, or I suggest clicking on the "Search" button link for more detailed search options.
  • Accident Reports: Sometimes difficult to locate, maintained by the Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) on microfilm. An accident report can run from just a few pages to a half dozen or more pages and may even include photos of the accident.
  • Unit Histories, War Diaries, Daily Reports, Station Memorandum, Special Orders, Public Relations Reports, Loading Lists, etc.: these unit documents are archived by the Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) at Maxwell AFB, Alabama. You can usually obtain squadron and group historical summaries at no cost through written request. You should also be able to obtain a specific monthly squadron diary upon request. A larger request, say for the entire War Diary, would probably necessitate a copying fee. You can order Group & Unit microfilm at $30.00 a roll from AFHRA. The microfilm rolls are usually divided up between Group histories, Squadron histories, and tenant command histories. You can e-mail AFHRA to obtain the roll numbers for your unit.
Visit: http://www.armyairforces.com/ResearchHelp.aspx

 

Invaluable Research Resources:

 

  • Identifinders International
    Identifinders has been involved in some of the most exciting forensic identification projects in recent years. Our large repertoire has required much versatility and creativity. It's no wonder that we are sought out for the most difficult cases where others have failed. In projects ranging from uncovering Misha Defonseca's Holocaust memoire fraud, to identifying the remains of a serviceman killed in an airplane crash in 1948, we have demonstrated an unequalled degree of success.

  • Obituarieshelp.net
    An informative and respected website designed to offer resources for obituaries, funerals and genealogy search

  • American Battle Monuments Commission: WWII Honor Roll, if the veteran you are searching for was killed in action and is still buried overseas he should be listed in this database. Burials in the domestic United States are not covered.

  • Department of Veterans Affairs: National Cemetery Administration - Nationwide Gravesite Locator, if your veteran is buried in a national cemetery, this database covers almost all 120 of them. Burials abroad are not covered.

  • WWII POW Database Search at NARA, the records identify World War II U.S. military officers and soldiers and U.S. and some Allied civilians who were prisoners of war (POWs) and internees. (Select the orange "Search" button, then "Wars / International Relations: World War II" link, Records of World War II Prisoners of War, created, 1942 - 1947 "Search" button). You can enter a search term right away if you know what terms to search for, or I suggest clicking on the "Search" button link for more detailed search options.

  • WWII MIA Database from the Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office. DPMO researchers have completed the first electronic listing of Missing Personnel from the Second World War, which is now available on the DPMO website.

  • WWII Army Enlistment Records, this can be a great way to find a serviceman's serial number and other basic details (Select the orange "Search" button, then "Wars / International Relations: World War II" link, World War II Army Enlistment Records "Search" button). You can enter a search term right away if you know what terms to search for, or I suggest clicking on the "Search" button link for more detailed search options.

    Note: About 35% of the records have a scanning error, these are minor spelling errors so search accordingly. Additionally, about 13% of the available paper records could not be converted for the database.

    Furthermore, these records are for persons who enlisted in the Army, Army Reserves, and Women's Auxiliary Corps during World War II (1938-1946). The records do not include Army officers; however, note that many officers enlisted first and were commissioned later when they finished their training - so you may be able to locate their initial enlistment records.

  • World War II Honor List of Dead and Missing Army and Army Air Forces Personnel, indexed by State. This resource is not searchable yet, the information presented online consists of image scans from the NARA publication.

  • The Veteran's Hometown News, This overlooked resource can be a huge asset. Dig through those archives and look for notices about service members. The public relations guys in WWII were great about getting notices posed in local papers about local servicemen; when they graduated from boot camp, training phases, were promoted, sometimes even in action overseas - it's worth your time.

  • Social Security Death Index at Rootsweb.com , FamilyTreeMaker.com, FamilyTreeLegends.com, FamilySearch.com, search these online indexes for likely matches. This resource can save you a lot of time.

  • World War II records held by NARA, nice overview of the NARA holdings.

Source: ArmyAirForces.com







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